The new DNA of future energy markets

How the transition of the global energy sectors challenges the world as we know it. And why this is good news!

Power to the People

Authors: Anna Leidreiter and Stefan Schurig

Delegates from more than 130 countries and world`s leading renewable energy experts meet for the next three days to discuss the global energy transition. The annual Assembly of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) has become one of the most important gathering. In fact, the way energy is produced, distributed and consumed in our societies is undergoing fundamental changes. With the majority of energy investments already going into renewable energy, we are doing more than substituting oil, gas, coal and nuclear with free energy from the wind and the sun. We are in fact building an entirely new global energy sector with a completely different DNA. [Read more →]

January 16, 2016   No Comments

Changing energy pathways means changing subsidy flows

pexels-photo

At the end of 2016 the US federal government is set to revert the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) on renewable energy from 30% back to the pre-2006 level of 10%, and similar policies are in motion in many other countries around the world. Simultaneously, and without signs of change, estimates suggest that US provided $37.5bn in fossil fuel subsidies in 2014, including $21bn in production and exploration subsidies. Creating a situation in which taxpayers are supporting polluting energy in favour of clean energy. [Read more →]

December 21, 2015   No Comments

Despite a weak outcome: Paris was first “renewables COP”

Mayors are in

The UN Climate Conference in Paris was a test to see whether national politicians could keep up with the change we are seeing in the real world. Looking at the final agreement published today, one must note: No, unfortunately, our national governments have not passed the test. Instead of a climate deal that phases out emissions by 2050 and allows the world to keep global warming below harmful 1.5 degree, we rather see a text that still tries to manage emissions instead of phasing them out. This is well reflected by the fact that parties could only agree upon the goal of “achieving a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases” rather than a pact for decarbonisation. [Read more →]

December 12, 2015   No Comments